Nocabulary

vocabpractice_content2

 

I guess you could say I make my living on words.

I write a sermon every week, and teach a class or two.

I write this devotion.

And it’s all based on words.  My ability to take an idea and translate it and convey it.

I’ve wondered what it would be like if I were sent to Korea.  Or China.

Some place where my vocabulary was suddenly a no-cabulary.

Would I be able to convey the awesomeness of God to someone who spoke another language?

Or what if I sat down with someone who was deaf?

Could I explain a life in the Spirit with crude hand gestures?

Hmm.  Have you ever thought about this?

You may or may not think of words as your bread and butter, but what if you were at a loss for them?

Could you testify to your faith?  Could you express what Christ means to you?

Paul says, in 2 Corinthians 9:15,  “Thanks be to God for his inexpressible gift!”, so apparently even Paul reached the limits of his words occasionally.

He’s describing an encounter with the ineffable.

“Ineffable:  too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words.”

Yes, more than a language barrier or an inadequate thesaurus, there are times when what God has given us is simply more than we can say.

The depth of that kind of connection with God cannot be explained, only experienced.

That  means no sermon or devotion or caring conversation will ever sufficiently capture the ineffable, unnameable, indescribable God of my life, or yours.

That doesn’t mean we can’t try.

Poets, philosophers, theologians and musicians have dedicated their lives to weaving words together that at least point towards God.

So, for me, I still think it’s a worthwhile calling.  Language can at least point in the right direction.

But if the inability of words to fully describe God’s Love has you feeling a little disillusioned…

Would you like a hug?  🙂

Have a great week,

Mitch

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